Tim Hain Tim Hain Jason Childs

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Thursday, 17 March 2016 05:04

"I don’t think direct competition is natural for Indonesian people" TIM HAIN

I would like to believe that the surf community can have an impact on the pollution problem here in Bali and in Indonesia...

 

Today our spotlight goes to Tim Hain, an American Surfer that choose the Island of Gods to live. Tim is giving a hand on the media support of the Asian Surfing Championships ( A.S.C.). Let's check what he have to say about the surfing in Indonésia, the Indonesian surfers and A.S.C.

 

 

"I would like to believe that the surf community can have an impact on the pollution problem here in Bali and in Indonesia, or anywhere in the world." Tim Hain

 

 

 

Surftotal:A.S.C. is a project that spread the competitive surfing from Indonesia to all the Southeast Asia?  We can resume it those words? Or it’s much more than that?

Tim hain: The ASC is an organization that has a mission to grow the sport of surfing in Asia, using surfing competitions to create exposure for the sport and also create more opportunity to grow the number of Asian professional surfers so that someday there will be an Asian world champion surfer.
 
 
There is a question(s) that always came to us... The Indonesian surfing people in general have a surfing competitive approach? Or the international surf culture made Indonesian surfers start to work more in this approach? Is it native from Indonesia culture, the competitive scenario?

I don’t think direct competition is natural for Indonesian people…face to face confrontations are culturally frowned upon, so although Indonesians are certainly competitive, societal pressure encourages them to be more passive aggressive rather than directly aggressive.
So in regards to surfing, they have to learn how to compete directly and by the rules, as for most it doesn’t come natural.  Just look at the way many people drive on the road, hahaha.  The top ASC surfers have certainly learned how to compete though, and with the groms (young surfers) coming up they are also learning how to compete under the WSL rules thanks to the ASC sanctioning most of the grom comps.  But they still need coaching and training from an early age to get their mindset solidly locked into the competitive mode when they are in the water, and to be disciplined.  In Europe, Australia, Sound America, America and other developed countries, kids grow up being directly competitive in sports, school, dating, everywhere, and with coaches/trainers etc, so its like its already in their DNA.  That’s why I think it will still take awhile before we see an Indonesian (or other Asians) getting onto the WCT and being one of the top 34 surfers in the world.


 *Beach Clean up (Rio Waida in the center)


Well we guess the problem of the pollution is also a major, or can be The real situation to solve. Indonesian surf community start to give the example as the “environmental heroes”?

I would like to believe that the surf community can have an impact on the pollution problem here in Bali and in Indonesia, or anywhere in the world.  But the painful truth is that surfing isn’t that big of a sport yet, not like football for example, so the effect will only be small as the masses don’t know or understand about surfing.  Perhaps only on a small level there can be some success in educating locals that live by the beach and get in the water every day.  We’ve always tried with the ISC and then the ASC to always run green contests and do educational environmental things at events, but sadly when we leave it seems like things just go back to the usual way most of the time.  Solutions are easy to talk about, but seem to be hard to implement and keep running.

 

 

"For me personally, the biggest challenge has been in the last two years.  When Tipi stepped away at the end of 2014, we had no sponsorship and no money in the bank" Tim Hain

 


 
Witch were so far the biggest challenges that you had to face in A.S.C.?

For me personally, the biggest challenge has been in the last two years.  When Tipi stepped away at the end of 2014, we had no sponsorship and no money in the bank, so we had to somehow make something out of nothing and keep the tour going.  We made it through 2014 ok, but then faced the same challenges again in 2015…at the beginning of the year nothing was solid, so it was quite stressful trying to make things happen all the time, and then mostly things happened last minute.  It turned out to be a great year, which has in turn made our 2016 much better as we’ve got a great line up of events on the board even this early in the year. So hard work and meeting the challenge day after day is paying off.

Tipi Jabrik made an excellent job on the ISC and ASC

 

 

Witch is the best thing that ever happened to you while at the A.S.C.?

Hard to choose just one thing…but I’ll say that if it wasn’t for my work at ASC, I wouldn’t have travelled to so many places and met all kinds of people, and had so many interesting experiences, so that’s the best thing about being at the ASC.
 
Now about this year, 2016, can you tell us witch are the main events we are going to have in Indonesia, and in southeast asia?

You can always look on our website to see the upcoming events, but the first one will be a WSL/ASC QS 1000 event at Lance’s Right in the Mentawais, the Mentawai Pro presented by Rip Curl in April, followed by another dual sanctioned QS1000 here in Bali at Keramas, the Komune Bali Pro presented by the Mad Hueys, in May.  Later in the year in October will be the Rote Open, and there are at least 3 other events being negotiated in other parts of Indonesia.  Outside of Indo, India, Maldives, Philippines, Taiwan, and hopefully China and Sri Lanka…most events co-sanctioned with the WSL.

 

 

 " I think if you sat down one-on-one with the top 10 ASC surfers, they would tell you that they really appreciate what the ASC has done for them." Tim Hain


 


Last question, being ASC the entity that somehow represents and defends the surfers in Southeast Asia, do you feel that the surfers have gratitude with A.S.C.?

Good question, hahaha.  I think if you sat down one-on-one with the top 10 ASC surfers, they would tell you that they really appreciate what the ASC has done for them.  But there are only a handful that ever say thank you to me personally and tell me how they appreciate what Tipi and I have done at the ASC.  I think its easy for many of the surfers to just kind of take it all for granted and not think about all the work that goes into it all.  They focus mostly on their surfing, and how to get enough money to travel and compete in the events…which I understand completely as well.
 

Any message you would like to send?

Just to say thanks to all who support the A.S.C. and help us in our mission to grow the sport of surfing here in Asia, from the old expat and local legends in here in Bali that started doing comps back in the 70’s, to the new supporters of surfing in places like India, Taiwan and China.  Keep exploring, keep pushing the boundaries, and keep chasing the dream of surfing around the world, while doing your part to stop polluting the ocean, the air and the land so we can leave a beautiful clean world for the future generations.


 

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  • Photo credit: Jason Childs
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